Categories: General
      Date: Nov 20, 2009
     Title: Jotting Judi’s books inspired by true stories

    Readers of the Dalhart Texan enjoy the writing of a local author of children’s books when she writes her weekly column.  Judi Wiegman, who pens the Jotting Judi column, has writing talent far greater than what readers get pleasure from each week.  She is also an author of children’s books.  To date, eight of Wiegman’s children’s books have been published, and she has recently been commissioned to begin her ninth. 



By Robin Scott

    Readers of the Dalhart Texan enjoy the writing of a local author of children’s books when she writes her weekly column.  Judi Wiegman, who pens the Jotting Judi column, has writing talent far greater than what readers get pleasure from each week.  She is also an author of children’s books.  To date, eight of Wiegman’s children’s books have been published, and she has recently been commissioned to begin her ninth.  

    Judi Wiegman, a/k/a Jotting Judi, has signed a contract with Beacon Hill Press, Nazarene Publishing House in Kansas City, for her eighth children’s book.   The book, part of the missionary reading program for the Nazarene World Mission division, is scheduled for publication in April 2010.

    Wiegman’s first book, Ikto’s Wonderful Gift was written in 1995, and was followed by Wrong Tickets to Tahiti, In the Shadow of a Stranger, Brian’s All-Star Day, The Trail of the Wooden Horse, The Mystery of the Tiny Key and A Stranger at the Gate.  The Trail of the Wooden Horse was translated into Spanish and titled Aquel caballio de Madera.

    All of Wiegman’s books are fiction, but some of the events in her stories were inspired by actual events and situations that Wiegman encountered while traveling to Albania and the Ukraine. 

    Wiegman chooses a “working title” for each of her books, but a book committee that works to finalize each book often changes the title.  The working title for Wiegman’s newest book is The Night of the Storm, which centers around a horrific tornado that swept through Cactus three years ago.  As a result of the storm, a church called Iglesia de Nazareno was established.  

Wiegman’s own personal favorite book is A Stranger at the Gate.  She calls the book “my prize.”  She noted, “While watching TV, I caught a glimpse of grade school children imprisoned in Iraq.  That situation became the basis for my story of a child I called ‘Akmed,’ who was rescued from the prison when U.S. Marines took the City of Baghdad.”  The story centers on a young boy imprisoned in Iraq when his parents refused to allow an older brother to fight in Saddam Hussein’s Army and is one that has touched Wiegman’s heart deeply.  Such trials and tribulations often give Wiegman the ideas that become her stories.

    Besides children’s books, Wiegman’s adult stories have been published in two books of collective stories for women.  She has also been published in a series of Devotional books.  Information about Wiegman, her books, and how to purchase them is readily available online.