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The perfect day


Posted by: tdt -

 


 

 By Robin Scott

 

Two weeks off from school brings with it many possibilities.  Playing outside, especially if snow falls, watching Christmas specials on TV, or visiting relatives and exchanging gifts.  All are exciting events in the life of a young child who tries to fall asleep early on Christmas Eve so that Santa will visit.
    Many children in the area provided their “ideas” for what would make the perfect Christmas vacation.  One little four-year-old girl stated, “I want Santa to come and I want snow to fall and I want lots of presents,” while her eight-year-old brother noted, “The perfect time off from school is when you get to sleep in late and eat whatever you want and you get to watch TV a lot more and stay up late.”
    Children instinctively know how to relax and enjoy the simple things that life offers, such as sleeping in late and eating whatever sounds the most pleasing.  They experience their own personal joys guilt free, with no worries over the calorie count or how staying up until past midnight might affect the next day’s ability to remain alert.  Children know exactly what they want when asked.  
    “I want a Wii and two new games,” or “I want everyone in the whole entire world to love Jesus.”  Children express themselves without ulterior motive or hesitation.  They say it like it is.  Becoming an adult seems to have a way of cutting off open communication and the onset of fear of judgment soon follows. 
    When asked about the perfect way to spend time away from work, adults contemplate before speaking, or provide a list of the “must dos,” rather than the “want tos.”  Wouldn’t it be an amazing world if people became more believing, altruistic and hopeful as they aged?  Why does wisdom mean the loss of fantasy and imagination?
    The perfect holiday vacation and time spent away from the usual should include doing those things that provide peace, happiness and true joy.  For little ones that does include receiving the “big” gift they have hoped and prayed for.  For adults it may be time to just sit and do absolutely nothing, or it could be the chance to see a favorite relative or friend.  Whatever the heart desires, there must be a way to incorporate some of it into the bustling season that places so many demands on everyone. 
    A child on vacation should, at the end, go back to school in January refreshed and ready to get a jump on the new semester.  A child should have created fond memories of their time off from school, and perhaps take those memories into adulthood and create traditions that will enrapture their own children someday.
    When a child is asked, “How do you want to spend your Christmas vacation?” they immediately know the answer.  The answer is generally simple and something that would be easy to achieve.  Adults could learn about “vacation” by asking little ones.  “I want to lay in bed and watch movies with my mom and dad!”  Isn’t that a perfect way to spend an afternoon?